Best GMAT Preparation Institute

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a standardized exam used to assess the qualifications of applicants to graduate business programs, such as MBA programs. The test measures verbal, mathematical and analytical writing skills and is intended to predict how well a candidate will perform in business school. The test is computer-adaptive, meaning that the difficulty of the questions adjusts based on the test taker’s previous answers. The GMAT is typically required for admission to business schools worldwide, and a good score can help increase a candidate’s chances of being accepted into a competitive program. The test is administered by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), and can be taken at test centers around the world.

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)

The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) section of the GMAT is a 30-minute test that measures a test taker’s ability to think critically and to communicate their thoughts effectively in writing. The AWA consists of one writing task, called the “Analysis of an Argument” task, in which test takers are presented with a written argument and are asked to evaluate its reasoning and to suggest ways to improve it.

The AWA is graded on a scale of 0 to 6, in half-point increments, by at least one trained reader and, if necessary, a second reader. The readers will evaluate the essay based on the following criteria:

Analysis of the argument’s reasoning
Development of ideas
Use of language and style
It is important to note that the GMAT AWA score is separate from the overall GMAT score, and some business schools may place more or less importance on this section.

The GMAT AWA is optional, which means that the test-taker have the option to skip it. However, it is worth noting that some business schools may require the AWA score as part of the application process.

A: The GMAT Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) is a 30-minute essay-writing task that tests a candidate’s ability to analyze an argument and communicate their ideas clearly and effectively.

A: The GMAT AWA consists of one essay-writing task, in which the candidate is presented with an argument and asked to analyze it. The candidate must then write an essay that evaluates the argument’s logic and presents their own perspective on the issue.

A: The GMAT AWA is scored on a scale of 0 to 6, in half-point increments. The essay is evaluated by two separate graders, who each assign a score based on the candidate’s ability to analyze the argument and communicate their ideas effectively.

A: The GMAT AWA carries less weight than the Quantitative and Verbal sections, but it is included in the overall GMAT score. Some business schools give more weight to the AWA score than others.

A: Yes, GMAC provides official AWA practice materials, including sample essay prompts and a guide to the types of questions that will be on the test. Additionally, there are many resources available online, such as practice questions, sample essays, and tips on how to write a high-scoring essay.

A: No, The GMAT AWA is mandatory, it is part of the GMAT exam and test takers are required to complete it.

The Integrated Reasoning (IR)

The Integrated Reasoning (IR) section of the GMAT measures a test taker’s ability to analyze data and make decisions based on that data. The IR section consists of 12 questions and has a total time of 30 minutes. The IR section is divided into four question types:

  1. Graphics Interpretation: test takers are presented with a graph or chart and are asked to interpret the data and answer questions about it.
  2. Two-Part Analysis: test takers are presented with a question and a set of answer choices, and are asked to select the correct answer from the choices and to also provide a numeric value.
  3. Table Analysis: test takers are presented with a table of data and are asked to answer questions about it.
  4. Multi-Source Reasoning: test takers are presented with information from multiple sources and are asked to integrate the information and answer questions about it.

The IR section is scored on a scale of 1 to 8, in single-point increments. This score is also separate from the overall GMAT score and like the AWA, some business schools may place more or less importance on this section.

It’s important to note that the IR section is designed to test the test taker’s ability to analyze data and make decisions, so it is important to practice with sample questions of the types included in the IR section in order to familiarize oneself with the format and content of the questions.

A: The Integrated Reasoning (IR) section is a part of the GMAT exam that tests a candidate’s ability to analyze and interpret data from multiple sources.

A: The IR section is 30 minutes long and contains 12 questions.

A: The IR section includes four types of questions: graphics interpretation, two-part analysis, table analysis, and multi-source reasoning.

A: GMAT scores range from 0 to 8. A score of 6 or higher is considered a good score for the IR section.

A: The GMAT IR section is scored separately from the Quantitative and Verbal sections, with scores ranging from 1 to 8.

A: The IR section carries less weight than the Quantitative and Verbal sections and is not included in the overall GMAT score. Business schools will see the scores of all 4 sections separately.

A: Yes, GMAC (Graduate Management Admission Council) the organization that conducts GMAT, provides official IR section practice materials, including sample questions and a guide to the types of questions that will be on the test.

The Quantitative section

The Quantitative section of the GMAT measures a test taker’s ability to understand, analyze and solve mathematical problems. The section consists of 31 multiple-choice questions and has a total time of 62 minutes. The questions in this section are divided into two types:

  1. Problem Solving: test takers are presented with a mathematical problem and are asked to solve it and choose the correct answer from a set of answer choices.
  2. Data Sufficiency: test takers are presented with a mathematical problem and two statements, and are asked to determine whether the information provided in the statements is sufficient to solve the problem or not.

The Quantitative section is computer-adaptive, which means that the difficulty of the questions adjusts based on the test taker’s previous answers. The score is reported on a scale of 0 to 60, in single-point increments.

The GMAT Quantitative section tests the test taker’s ability to understand, analyze and solve mathematical problems, it includes topics such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and basic data analysis. It is important to note that the GMAT quantitative section is not designed to test advanced mathematical knowledge, but rather to test the test taker’s ability to think critically and solve problems using basic mathematical concepts.

The GMAT Quantitative section tests the test taker’s ability to understand, analyze and solve mathematical problems, it includes topics such as:

  • Arithmetic: basic operations, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and proportions, etc.
  • Algebra: basic algebraic concepts, equations and inequalities, functions, etc.
  • Geometry: basic geometric concepts, lines, angles, triangles, circles, etc.
  • Basic Data Analysis: probability, statistics, counting, permutations and combinations, etc.

It’s important to note that the GMAT quantitative section is not designed to test advanced mathematical knowledge, but rather to test the test taker’s ability to think critically and solve problems using basic mathematical concepts.

In addition, the GMAT quantitative section is computer-adaptive, which means that the difficulty of the questions adjusts based on the test taker’s previous answers. This means that the test taker will receive more difficult questions if they are answering correctly and easier questions if they are answering incorrectly.

To prepare for the GMAT quantitative section, test takers are encouraged to review basic mathematical concepts, practice solving problems, and become familiar with the format and content of the questions that will be on the test. Practice tests and study guides are available online and can be used to help test takers prepare for the GMAT quantitative section.

FQA for GMAT Quantitative Section

The GMAT Quantitative Section consists of 31 multiple-choice questions, which are divided into two types: Problem-Solving and Data Sufficiency.

Test takers have 75 minutes to complete the Quantitative Section of the GMAT.


The GMAT Quantitative Section is not based on a specific math curriculum, but it tests a test taker’s ability to apply mathematical concepts and skills to solve problems.

The GMAT Quantitative Section is a computer-adaptive test. This means that the difficulty level of the questions will adapt to the test-taker’s ability level.

Calculators are not allowed during the GMAT Quantitative Section. Test takers will be provided with an on-screen calculator to use.

The GMAT Quantitative Section is scored on a scale of 0 to 60.

You can prepare for the GMAT Quantitative Section by reviewing math concepts and practicing problem-solving strategies. Many test-preparation resources are available, such as study guides, practice tests, and online tutorials.

GMAT Verbal Section

The GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) is a standardized test used to assess applicants’ readiness for graduate-level business programs. The verbal section of the GMAT tests the candidate’s ability to read and comprehend written material, as well as to reason and evaluate arguments. The verbal section consists of three types of questions: Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. The section is scored on a scale of 0-60, with the average score being around 28-30.

The GMAT verbal section lasts for 75 minutes and consists of 41 multiple-choice questions. The section is designed to test the candidate’s ability to understand and analyze written material, as well as to evaluate arguments and draw logical conclusions. The questions in the verbal section are based on passages taken from various sources, such as academic texts, business publications, and newspapers.

The Reading Comprehension questions test the candidate’s ability to understand the main idea and key details of a passage, as well as to make inferences and draw logical conclusions. The Critical Reasoning questions test the candidate’s ability to evaluate arguments and identify logical flaws. The Sentence Correction questions test the candidate’s ability to recognize and correct errors in grammar, usage, and sentence structure.

In order to prepare for the GMAT verbal section, candidates should focus on developing their reading and comprehension skills, as well as their ability to analyze and evaluate arguments. They can do this by reading a variety of texts, practicing critical reasoning and sentence correction questions, and taking practice tests. Additionally, many test preparation resources are available, such as books, courses, and online materials.

Frequently Asked Questions (FQA) for the GMAT Verbal Section may include:

The GMAT Verbal section lasts for 75 minutes.

The GMAT Verbal section consists of 41 multiple-choice questions.

The GMAT Verbal section includes Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction questions.

The GMAT Verbal section is scored on a scale of 0-60.

The average score for the GMAT Verbal section is around 28-30.

To prepare for the GMAT Verbal section, candidates can focus on developing their reading and comprehension skills, as well as their ability to analyze and evaluate arguments. They can do this by reading a variety of texts, practicing critical reasoning and sentence correction questions, and taking practice tests. Additionally, many test preparation resources are available, such as books, courses, and online materials.

Yes, there are specific strategies that can be applied to the GMAT Verbal section. Such as skimming, reading actively, and practicing as much as possible.

The official GMAT website (www.mba.com) is a great resource for information on the GMAT exam, including test format, registration, and study materials.

The GMATPrep software, available for free download from the official GMAT website, offers two full-length practice tests and additional practice questions.

The GMAT Official Guide is a comprehensive study guide that includes real GMAT questions from past exams, as well as detailed answer explanations.

The GMAT Focus Online Quiz Bank offers additional practice questions and allows you to customize quizzes based on topic and difficulty level.

The GMAT Club (www.gmatclub.com) is a popular online forum for GMAT test takers, with resources such as study plans, practice questions, and advice from other test takers.

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